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This blog aims to share our methodologies and philosophies when working with Looked After Children, which led to the huge success of "And The Beat Goes On 2".

In the second of this three part series, some of the young people we work with at More Music share their experiences of how coming to projects and playing music has a positive impact on mental health and well being.

 

Week after week we read reports about the rising number of students disclosing a mental illlness when they arrive at university (Krause, 2017), of how ‘girls and young women are experiencing a “gathering crisis” in their mental health linked to conflict with friends, fears of body image and pressures created by social media’ (Campbell, 2017). That in an average class of 30 schoolchildren, 3 will suffer from a diagnosable mental health disorder; of how social media platforms, described as more addictive than cigarettes, are detrimental to young people’s mental health and well being (2016, RSPH).

On a wet Tuesday morning, Scottish pop artist, singer, songwriter and producer Charlotte Brimner from Be Charlotte, along with her guitarist Stuart and manager Louie descended upon Lancaster & Morecambe College to begin a short college tour of the North West. 

My experience of the Level 1 Inspire Project at Kingfisher Special School

The Family Songbook was a project for 3-4 year olds at risk of language delay (and their parents) in Burnley, Lancashire, using music to build confidence and communication skills whilst widening access to participation in music making activities. Music leaders Ben McCabe from More Music, Zoe Greenhalgh, Sally-Anne Roberts and Beth Allen delivered sessions over a six week programme in five settings, two community centres and three formal EYFS providers, engaging over a hundred children and sixty five parents.

Delia Stevens, percussionist and member of world-folk-fusion quintet Kabantu, blogs about the benefits of music making for children and families.

Delia Stevens, percussionist and member of world-folk-fusion quintet Kabantu, blogs about the benefits of music making for children and families.

Delia Stevens, percussionist and member of world-folk-fusion quintet Kabantu, blogs about the benefits of music making for children and families.

Soundtracks started delivering music sessions in June 2016. Blackburn with Darwen Music Service, working in partnership with Blackburn Youth Zone and local authority Young People’s Service has set up a programme of weekly open access sessions taking place in youth centres, taster sessions which promote these opportunities, and regular performance events for young people in different venues.

Allsorts is a music project that takes places every week during term time at Z-arts in Hulme, Manchester. We have two sessions that currently take place: Allsorts Essentials for 5-10 year olds and Allsorts Unplugged for 11-16 year olds. Many of the young people that attend our sessions have little to no access to any other music projects, and Allsorts is the one time during their week they feel they can express themselves, socialise and be creative. Thanks to Youth Music, Allsorts has been running for a number of years. For 2018 there is going to be some exciting new changes to the project. We listened to what our young musicians had to say, and were exctied for the future! 

The gamelan orchestra was centre stage for the BlueJam Arts ‘Big Sing at the Big Screen’ event at Rheged, Cumbria on 17 October 2017.