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A powerful testimony that national education policy makers should hear.

Cymaz Music has been working with Cornwall Music Education Hub (CMEH) since before it's inception. We have worked hard to ensure that inclusion is at the core of the Hub and have been involved as delivery and strategic partners since the beginning. This has included research and consultation into barriers and cold spots in the county as well as designing targeted programmes of support to ensure that the most vulnerable children and young people in Cornwall have had access to music provision.

This is part of a keynote I delivered in March at Colston Hall to the RESEO conference (www.reseo.org). It is heavily plaigarised and I have tried to give credit to those whose copy and ideas I have nicked. It's more of a rant than an attempt to put forward new ideas but it sums up what I think of technology. Thanks for reading...

I’ve been working a lot recently on problems; not challenges; problems. Things that need fixing. Take, for example, the fact that there are a great deal of opportunities for young people to make music and realise their musical potential. On the matrix of music (don’t ask me to draw it, please) they range from the super-formal, to the mega-zany and include lots of examples of stuff that is in more than one place on the continuum at the same time (which is why I don’t want to draw it). One very significant problem is that there is next to nothing for musically-inclined young people (yeah, I know they pretty much all are) who have a special educational need and/or are disabled. Sure, there is some stuff. Some organisations do really good stuff. But, on the grand scheme of things, it’s just stuff. If the funding stops, so does the stuff.