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This blog aims to share our methodologies and philosophies when working with Looked After Children, which led to the huge success of "And The Beat Goes On 2".

This is the story of 4 lads working with My Pockets to find thier own sound.

Why it is important to support emerging music leaders

In the final part of my blog about how we can support young people  and their mental health through the arts, I discuss how we have begun to embed mental health champions into our young people's delivery team as well as proactively promoting the positive impact of engaging with the music projects we already offer.
 

JW was asked to deliver a 5 minute presentation for Friday 16th February at the Ordinary Arts Festival Seminar.  The seminar speakers were all asked to focus their presentation on addressing 2 questions:

What barriers does your organisation present in offering access to disabled young people?
What barriers do you face form other organisations or society when designing your offer for disabled young people?

Here’s a transcription JW’s presentation ;

‘Hi  I’m Jane Williams, Director of The Turning Tides Project. We aim to make equal access to music, the arts and life a reality for people with ‘learning disability’ or ‘autism’ labels.  

We only have 2 rules:

Everything we do seeks to demonstrate the Social Model Approach , in action
We don’t do anything unless we think it will be fun.

I was struggling with preparing this presentation . When I asked myself why I found I had 2 issues :

Even if you talk fast, you can’t say much in 5 minutes: How will I make sure I say the things that matter?
I’m not sure that making seminar presentations is fun

Then it occurred to me, I just needed to be who am and demonstrate what The Turning Tides Project is. A 5 minute presentation might not be long but 3 1/2 minutes is the perfect length for a hit song.
So here’s ours. It’s called  ‘Who are the Experts?' and we wrote it for you - enjoy and do feel free to join in.'

Is an approach to inclusion organisational progress?
Or a statement of a fall-back position to exclude?
Who invented our indicators and outcome jargon?
Did disabled young people write our rules?
 
Who are the experts?
 
Self-appointed inclusion experts
Our reaching out makes us hard to reach
Equal access makes us all redundant
That’s the position we need to preach
 
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?
 
 instrumental break 
 
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?
 
The detail that matters is not our detail
Is anyone really hard to reach
If it was fun, cool and useful it wouldn’t be me
Standing here making this speech
 
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?

Once we’ve recorded it, you’ll be able to download ‘Who are The Experts’ and hear some of the other original music of The Tuning Tides Project at: https://soundcloud.com/tttp-1

Supporting quieter members of a group – my techniques for ensuring everyone is involved from a shadow artist point of view.

My Pockets worked with Two Way Street in Hull to write a song - It’s Hard To Think Of The Future.

Identifying young talented music leaders who can positively impact the lives of the generation of young people is something that has been a key feature of Romsey Mill's work in Cambridge. 

Here is an example of how that objective has been met in the lives of two young people whose passion for music has led them to give something back to help other young lives.

An evening of workshops for musicians and music teachers alike: sharing best practice and building confidence in teaching methods
with talks from Stacey Riley, David Oliver & Stewart Hardy.

 

In the second of this three part series, some of the young people we work with at More Music share their experiences of how coming to projects and playing music has a positive impact on mental health and well being.

 

We are delighted to announce that we have been selected to present at Aesop's 2nd national Arts in Health Conference & Showcase which will be held in April at Milton Court, in partnership with the Guildhall School of Music & Drama and the College of Medicine.

We will be presenting about our programme of work at Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital; 'Medical Notes: Music at the Heart of Life' along with 23 other arts programmes with ‘current health priorities’ at the heart of what they do.

‘Confirmed speakers include: Dame Darcey Bussell DBE President of the Royal Academy of Dance & Founder of Diverse Dance Mix, Professor Gillian Leng CBE NICE Deputy Chief Executive and Director of Health & Social Care, Professor Tim Kendall NHS England National Clinical Director for Mental Health, Dr Martin Vernon NHS England National Clinical Director for Older People and Noel Gordon, Chair at NHS Digital, NHS England Non-Executive Director & Board member’.

It will be such a wonderful opportunity for us to showcase our impactful and pioneering work in the field of Music for Health.

You can read more in the Press article below and there is also a link on there to book tickets to attend the conference.

http://www.ae-sop.org/category/article/

@AesopHealth  #AesopConf

Sounding Out is a three-year music programme with deaf and hearing impaired (HI) pupils, now in its final year. It involves weekly workshops in one primary and one secondary school, as well as a research element being undertaken by University College London to explore musical progression as well as impacts on the communication skills of participants. In this blog our lead practitioner, Tiziana Pozzo, reflects on the interaction of movement, theatre and music, and on why a multisensory approach seems to achieve good results with these students.