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This blog aims to share our methodologies and philosophies when working with Looked After Children, which led to the huge success of "And The Beat Goes On 2".

In the final part of my blog about how we can support young people  and their mental health through the arts, I discuss how we have begun to embed mental health champions into our young people's delivery team as well as proactively promoting the positive impact of engaging with the music projects we already offer.
 

JW was asked to deliver a 5 minute presentation for Friday 16th February at the Ordinary Arts Festival Seminar.  The seminar speakers were all asked to focus their presentation on addressing 2 questions:

What barriers does your organisation present in offering access to disabled young people?
What barriers do you face form other organisations or society when designing your offer for disabled young people?

Here’s a transcription JW’s presentation ;

‘Hi  I’m Jane Williams, Director of The Turning Tides Project. We aim to make equal access to music, the arts and life a reality for people with ‘learning disability’ or ‘autism’ labels.  

We only have 2 rules:

Everything we do seeks to demonstrate the Social Model Approach , in action
We don’t do anything unless we think it will be fun.

I was struggling with preparing this presentation . When I asked myself why I found I had 2 issues :

Even if you talk fast, you can’t say much in 5 minutes: How will I make sure I say the things that matter?
I’m not sure that making seminar presentations is fun

Then it occurred to me, I just needed to be who am and demonstrate what The Turning Tides Project is. A 5 minute presentation might not be long but 3 1/2 minutes is the perfect length for a hit song.
So here’s ours. It’s called  ‘Who are the Experts?' and we wrote it for you - enjoy and do feel free to join in.'

Is an approach to inclusion organisational progress?
Or a statement of a fall-back position to exclude?
Who invented our indicators and outcome jargon?
Did disabled young people write our rules?
 
Who are the experts?
 
Self-appointed inclusion experts
Our reaching out makes us hard to reach
Equal access makes us all redundant
That’s the position we need to preach
 
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?
 
 instrumental break 
 
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?
 
The detail that matters is not our detail
Is anyone really hard to reach
If it was fun, cool and useful it wouldn’t be me
Standing here making this speech
 
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?
Who are the experts?

Once we’ve recorded it, you’ll be able to download ‘Who are The Experts’ and hear some of the other original music of The Tuning Tides Project at: https://soundcloud.com/tttp-1

An evening of workshops for musicians and music teachers alike: sharing best practice and building confidence in teaching methods
with talks from Stacey Riley, David Oliver & Stewart Hardy.

 

The Equal Access to Music Programme  comprises a set of Projects . The Programme has emerged from our experience of taking a Social Model Approach to make equal access to music a reality for Young People with ' autism' or 'learning disability' labels .  We'd welcome discussion about the development of ' Inclusive Music Facilitators' 

For more detail about the Projects please visit : http://www.theturningtidesproject.org.uk/equal-access-to-music-programme...    

 

 

 

 

 

My experience of the Level 1 Inspire Project at Kingfisher Special School

Jack Drum Arts’ ‘Wear Making Music’ Youth Music programme took to the forest for an evening of mythological magic and mayhem!

Community music and music education were at the centre of the conversation at the TEDx event in Lincoln late last year, as soundLINCS’ CEO Nikki-Kate Heyes MBE gave a fantastic speech on the topic “Community Music: A Power for Change”.

The Ark T Centre's My Normal Music project ran a pilot year funded by Youth Music in 2017. The project is an intersectional Project working with young people with disabilities (including mental health) and LGBTQ+ young people.  

This year has seen such growth in our Music Project, the young people we have worked with and our staff on the project. Below our Project Manager, Hanah Bruce, shares some of the learning and reflections on the project.

“Writing and making music helps me to express my emotions in a calm, productive way and helps me to deal with situations which I would struggle to deal with. It helps me understand and evaluate situations more clearly rather than have everything get confused in my head. It’s a good way to get everything out and say everything I want to say.”

Conductors for Change gives music leaders the tools, strategies and practical conducting techniques to set up a new instrumental ensemble, or develop an existing one. Created by a team of highly experienced music directors and educators this flexible programme of hands-on training days is rooted in inclusive practice.

We All Make Music is an inspiring, inclusive music education festival! Join us to be part of the conversation, get hands on with tech, network with people from across the sector and start making change towards a genuinely inclusive musical culture.