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In the second of this three part series, some of the young people we work with at More Music share their experiences of how coming to projects and playing music has a positive impact on mental health and well being.

 

Looking for young people aged 11-23 who have a diagnosis of autism to take part in a music project

  • by mlkirby

    Mon 12 Feb 2018 - 1 comment

I am looking for young people age 11-23 with a diagnosis of autism

I am looking for young people aged 11-23 with a diagnosis of autism

The Equal Access to Music Programme  comprises a set of Projects . The Programme has emerged from our experience of taking a Social Model Approach to make equal access to music a reality for Young People with ' autism' or 'learning disability' labels .  We'd welcome discussion about the development of ' Inclusive Music Facilitators' 

For more detail about the Projects please visit : http://www.theturningtidesproject.org.uk/equal-access-to-music-programme...    

 

 

 

 

 

Week after week we read reports about the rising number of students disclosing a mental illlness when they arrive at university (Krause, 2017), of how ‘girls and young women are experiencing a “gathering crisis” in their mental health linked to conflict with friends, fears of body image and pressures created by social media’ (Campbell, 2017). That in an average class of 30 schoolchildren, 3 will suffer from a diagnosable mental health disorder; of how social media platforms, described as more addictive than cigarettes, are detrimental to young people’s mental health and well being (2016, RSPH).

Trinity Laban's music Learning & Participation team are working in partnership with Ark Evelyn Grace Academy to research how cultural organisations can work in partnership with schools to support young people to progress in their music making, funded by Youth Music.  We are now at the midway point of our funding and are reflecting on the activity of 2017 to inform activities planned for 2018.

On a wet Tuesday morning, Scottish pop artist, singer, songwriter and producer Charlotte Brimner from Be Charlotte, along with her guitarist Stuart and manager Louie descended upon Lancaster & Morecambe College to begin a short college tour of the North West. 

The Family Songbook was a project for 3-4 year olds at risk of language delay (and their parents) in Burnley, Lancashire, using music to build confidence and communication skills whilst widening access to participation in music making activities. Music leaders Ben McCabe from More Music, Zoe Greenhalgh, Sally-Anne Roberts and Beth Allen delivered sessions over a six week programme in five settings, two community centres and three formal EYFS providers, engaging over a hundred children and sixty five parents.

The Ark T Centre's My Normal Music project ran a pilot year funded by Youth Music in 2017. The project is an intersectional Project working with young people with disabilities (including mental health) and LGBTQ+ young people.  

This year has seen such growth in our Music Project, the young people we have worked with and our staff on the project. Below our Project Manager, Hanah Bruce, shares some of the learning and reflections on the project.

“Writing and making music helps me to express my emotions in a calm, productive way and helps me to deal with situations which I would struggle to deal with. It helps me understand and evaluate situations more clearly rather than have everything get confused in my head. It’s a good way to get everything out and say everything I want to say.”