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Noise Solution's focus on capturing impact and finding a validated means of measuring well-being has led to funding from the Suffolk Clinical Commissioning Group. This is a huge validation for Noise Solution and a recognition that, when properly evidenced community music can be commissioned as a clinical intervention.

A powerful testimony that national education policy makers should hear.

A perfect storm is rapidly approaching in music education in England. Read on to see how you can help and gain support.

As external evaluators of Fund C, we are delighted to share some initial research findings and observations about what needs to be put in place for partnership-working to be effective and about its role in embedding inclusive music-making strategically and at scale.  

A project that looks to bring together Downs Syndrome support groups through musical collaboration; training and mentoring for young female musicians; music technology with children and young people in challenging circumstances; and music and play in palliative care, all make up Sound Connections Innovate programme 2017.

If you are not taking impact capture seriously for the projects you are running then I believe you to be looking down the barrel of a funding gun. It amazes me how many organisations don't collect the simplest of data like attendance or any form of 'story' from their participants. Money is scarce and getting scarcer. Commissioner's and grant givers require evidence that what we do is effective. 

Amber (21) is a volunteer and part of the Youth Music Reprezent training programme, has written from the heart about classism, austerity and how grime music's relation to poorer areas has been to some degree weaponised by journalists to belittle tragic loss.

Following the deaths of two young aspiring musicians from South East London, a minority of journalists chose to use these deaths to provide a context for articles that were arguably written to cause controversy, sell papers or bait for clicks.

Reprezent works with a lot of young people from these areas who are aspiring artists and have been a starting point for several high profile careers (Stormzy, Novelist, Lady Leshurr, Section Boys). Whilst grime music has elements of 'realness', it is questionable for a journalist to use one persons aspirations to succeed as a musician as an indicator that they were more likely to die than someone else.

Anyway, this is Ambers story...

Back in 2011, the National Plan for Music Education was published, with great aplomb.  It stated that ““children from all backgrounds and every part of England” should have “…equality of opportunity … regardless of race; gender; where they live; their levels of musical talent; parental income; whether they have special educational needs or disabilities; and whether they are looked after”.  

  • by Rhythmix

    Tue 2 Aug 2016 - 1 comment

We are excited to announce the launch of the National Alliance of Musicians in Healthcare!

We are excited to announce the launch of the National Alliance of Musicians in Healthcare!

Over the past few years a network has been forming across the UK of organisations and individuals working in partnership with healthcare services to provide music making programmes in hospitals, hospices and community settings. This network has now formed an Alliance so that we can advocate for our work with one strong, coherent voice.

Please visit our website here and consider joining the Alliance if you or your organisation identifies with our aims and mission: http://www.namih.org/

The Music Education Council is a non-party political organisation that simply strives to ‘promote and advance the education and training of the public in music’.