Children's musical behaviour

  • by Anonymous (not verified)

    Wednesday, 16 September, 2015 - 16:02

The information on this page is taken from the publication, Music with the Under-Fours (2003) by Susan Young. It is intended to help musicians and early years practitioners understand the different characteristics of each phase as children progress and develop. This will then help you to effectively plan and evaluate your work.
Click on the dots below for more information 

Waypointwaypoint/introduction-0Introduction173.0125.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/musical-babiesMusical babies251.0303.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/musical-toddlersMusical toddlers532.0224.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/musical-pre-school-childrenMusical pre-school children836.0210.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/go-back-28Go back5.03.0""#0000002

The information on this page is taken from the publication, Music with the Under-Fours (2003) by Susan Young. It is intended to help musicians and early years practitioners understand the different characteristics of each phase as children progress and develop. This will then help you to effectively plan and evaluate your work.
Click on the dots below for more information 


Click here for a text version of this visualisation

Introduction

Research (Birnholz, 1883) has shown that the foetus starts to process sounds between 16 – 20 weeks. This has been investigated through measuring movement and heart rate after exposure to sound and shows heartbeat increases or decreases in response to sound starting at about 20 weeks. Motor responses to loud noises begin at 24 weeks and become consistent at about 28-32 weeks. While in the womb, the foetus hears outside sounds as well as the mother’s heartbeat and digestive system and learns to recognise their mother’s voice.

Musical babies

Musical babies:

  • recognise their mother’s voice and music at birth
  • make fine aural discriminations
  • communicate musically with care givers
  • are assisted in emotional and physical regulation by music
  • are soothed and settled by lullabies, physical contact, and rocking
  • are interested and stimulated by play-songs
  • can anticipate phrasing of known songs
  • enjoy being moved rhythmically
  • listen intently to interesting sounds and music
  • shake, tap, lift and drop objects to explore sounds they make
  • explore their voices with single syllable sounds.

Susan Young, Joanna Glover, “Music in the Early Years" (Routledge, 1998), pp. 133-135.

Musical toddlers

Musical toddlers:

  • become more independent across a range of musical activities
  • begin to vocalise freely – solo in play, communicative with others
  • participate in play-songs and songs sung to them in individual ways
  • start to learn songs and can reproduce them in individual ways
  • shake and tap objects or instruments to produce sound with more controlled, fine motor skills
  • develop rhythmic, large body movements and begin to learn controls and coordination
  • enjoy repeating and transforming short musical ideas
  • are aware of the sound of music from home culture
  • show responses to music being performed, from intent listening to energetic dancing
  • imitate the musical actions of others.

Susan Young, Joanna Glover, “Music in the Early Years" (Routledge, 1998), pp. 133-135.

Musical pre-school children

Musical pre-school children:

  • sing spontaneously in a range of different ways, alone and with others
  • learn to sing in own vocal range – singing slowly, with quiet dynamics and short phrases
  • begin to pitch match, keep in time with, and co-ordinate their musical ideas with others
  • can repeat, transform, combine and develop their own or borrowed musical ideas into increasingly complex structures
  • learn to control and co-ordinate whole body and finer body movements, increasing their range of possibilities in dance and playing instruments – at their own pace
  • dance spontaneously to recorded or live music
  • are ‘open-eared’ to a wide range of musical styles and knowledgeable about music from their home culture
  • can be an audience listener to live music for short periods of time.

Susan Young, Joanna Glover, “Music in the Early Years" (Routledge, 1998), pp. 133-135.

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