Spotlighting Earlyarts professional development days

  • by Anonymous (not verified)

    Wednesday, 16 September, 2015 - 16:02

Earlyarts is a national network for people working creatively with children and families in the arts, cultural and early years sectors. A key part of its work is working through a network of Pathfinder partner organisations to run professional development days for creative artists and early years practitioners wanting to develop their skills in supporting young children's creativity.
Through Spotlighting, Youth Music supported Earlyarts to document and evaluate their training days. The results are all on the visualisation below. Click on the dots to find out more about the training days and what participants got out of them, through a series of short films.
This page is part of a resource pack on Earlyarts professional development days

Waypointwaypoint/play-learn-training-day-onePlay to learn: Training day one44.0421.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/exploring-creativity-outdoors-training-day-twoExploring creativity outdoors: Training day two339.0420.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/beachcombing-creativity-training-day-threeBeachcombing for creativity: Training day three634.0418.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/what-changes-will-you-make-your-practiceWhat changes will you make to your practice?630.0839.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/what-key-messages-will-you-take-back-earlyarts-trainingWhat key messages will you take back from this Earlyarts training337.0838.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/how-has-involvement-earlyarts-training-made-differenceHow has involvement in Earlyarts training made a difference?35.0841.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/how-do-children-respond-creative-approachesHow do children respond to creative approaches337.0602.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/what-are-you-hoping-get-out-trainingWhat are you hoping to get out of the training?39.0602.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/what-impacts-can-you-see-their-learning-and-developmentWhat impacts can you see on their learning and development?627.0603.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/evaluation-report-1Evaluation report46.0106.0""#0000002

Earlyarts is a national network for people working creatively with children and families in the arts, cultural and early years sectors. A key part of its work is working through a network of Pathfinder partner organisations to run professional development days for creative artists and early years practitioners wanting to develop their skills in supporting young children's creativity.
Through Spotlighting, Youth Music supported Earlyarts to document and evaluate their training days. The results are all on the visualisation below. Click on the dots to find out more about the training days and what participants got out of them, through a series of short films.
This page is part of a resource pack on Earlyarts professional development days


Click here for a text version of this visualisation

Play to learn: Training day one

The training day was run by Theatre of Adventure with The Priory Children’s Centre (Great Yarmouth) at the University of East Anglia’s School of Education & Lifelong Learning (Norwich). The theme of the day was playfulness and imagination within creative early years pedagogies.

 

  • After introductions and welcomes some contextual understanding of the sector was provided by:
    • Hannah Foreacre, Relationship Manager, Engagement and Participation Arts Council England who talked about the Arts Council’s Bridge Organisations and how they would fulfil their role of bringing together arts and education
    • Maureen Brookson, Senior Lecturer in Early Years at University of East Anglia who presented research around the subject of “Play to learn: why we need the imagination and playfulness of artists”
    • Lyndall Rosewarne, Regional Officer for Youth Music who outlined an overview of Youth Music’s work in developing and funding creative music projects for under 5s
  • Time for information sharing then followed, including speed networking, key events coming up in the sector, review of the latest research and publications, and raising awareness of the Earlyarts Put Yourself on the Map Campaign
  • After a networking lunch, Charlotte Arculus, Early Years music and playfulness specialist ran her “Communicative Musical Funniness” workshop which explored how children’s musicality is central to language development; developing ways to support children’s communication by tuning into their music making; how we respond and lead with playfulness; and the musicality of playfulness
  • A second workshop, ‘Little People, Big Stories’ led by Suzanne Arnold, Story specialist, puppeteer and social entrepreneur,  invited the participants to build their practice-based skills at the same time as developing clear links into the early years creative pedagogy. This included ways of working with very young children; building stories as a community; early years and family work; and story making in education.
  • The event closed with participants sharing experiences and feeding back to one another.

 

Exploring creativity outdoors: Training day two

Sutton Ecology Centre in South London hosted a session which focussed on exploring the outdoors as a stimulus for creative early years development.

 

  • Following an introduction to Earlyarts and the Sutton Pathfinder, practitioner Mary Buckton led a practical workshop sharing her experience of working at the ecology centre and how to use the environment to extend children’s creativity through sensory activities. This included reference to local good practice and case studies/experiences from local settings.
  • Karin Andrews Jashapara then led a hands-on exploration of storytelling in a session called ‘The Name of the Tree’
  • An information sharing and networking session then followed, focussing on local news, creative early years opportunities and events
  • In the final session Rebecca Moody facilitated an outdoors workshop introducing elements of forest school practice and how to extend children’s experiences of the natural world
  • The event closed with participants feeding back and sharing their reflections on the day.

Beachcombing for creativity: Training day three

This event was run by West Sussex County Council in partnership with East Sussex County Council and held at St Leonards Children's Centre. It focussed on the theme of Beachcombing for Creativity – meeting today’s challenges for early years creativity using found objects. It shared the adapted Forest Schools approach for use in beach environments, ‘Beach Schools’ as well as important insight into the latest changes in early years education and what impact this will have  on nurturing children’s creativity.

 

  • After an introduction and speed networking event, the day started with an investigation of the Early Years Foundation Stage Tickell Review, asking “What will be the effects on creativity?” The discussion was led by Carole Somers; Children's Centre Senior Early Years Teacher and Jennette Abel; Teacher leading on 0-2s provision.
  • A visit to St Nick’s Nursery followed to explore the practices used there, with Kirsty Halvey – Early Years Service Manager for Fellowship of St Nicholas.
  • The final session of the morning offered updates on local and national practice and the national network, led by Clare Halstead – West Sussex County Council Earlyarts Pathfinder Partner
  • The afternoon workshop ‘Beach School’ provided a series of practical activities in small groups with practitioners from Hastings & St Leonards Children’s Centres. Activities included rock pooling, building fires, making shelters, assessing risk, and identifying differences of beach flora and fauna. As well as awareness of tides and weather conditions.
  • A feedback and reflection session closed the day.

What changes will you make to your practice?

 

 

What key messages will you take back from this Earlyarts training

 

 

How has involvement in Earlyarts training made a difference?

 

 

How do children respond to creative approaches

 

 

What are you hoping to get out of the training?

 

 

What impacts can you see on their learning and development?

 

 

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