Planning your project

  • by Anonymous (not verified)

    Wednesday, 16 September, 2015 - 16:02

Click on the dots for more information and advice on planning your early years project.

Waypointwaypoint/first-questionsFirst questions36.0120.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/first-questionsFirst questions36.0120.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/good-planningGood planning35.0163.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/good-planningGood planning35.0163.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/building-relationshipsBuilding relationships35.0205.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/building-relationshipsBuilding relationships35.0205.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/planning-sustainabilityPlanning for sustainability36.0246.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/planning-sustainabilityPlanning for sustainability36.0246.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/planning-questionsPlanning questions37.0288.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/planning-questionsPlanning questions37.0288.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/sharing-perspectives-knowledge-and-skillsSharing perspectives, knowledge and skills642.0644.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/sharing-perspectives-knowledge-and-skillsSharing perspectives, knowledge and skills642.0644.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/sharing-perspectives-knowledge-and-skillsSharing perspectives, knowledge and skills642.0644.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/key-principles-planningKey principles for planning406.0402.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/key-principles-planningKey principles for planning406.0402.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/continuing-professional-developmentContinuing professional development6.0635.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/continuing-professional-developmentContinuing professional development6.0635.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/case-studiesCase studies407.0910.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/case-studiesCase studies407.0910.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/go-back-21Go back7.03.0""#0000002
Waypointwaypoint/further-resourcesFurther resources37.0329.0""#0000002

Click on the dots for more information and advice on planning your early years project.


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First questions

Here are some useful and important questions to ask yourself before embarking on the planning for an early years music project:

  • Why do we want to do this music project?
  • What do we want to achieve by working with a musician?
  • What are the needs of our children, adults, and environment that need to be considered and how can we make sure that working with a musician will meet those needs?
  • Do we have a shared image of the child and their role as learners, and how does this impact on our practice?
  • How do we make sure that the project is sustainable and has a legacy beyond the life of the project?
  • How can a sense of shared ownership for all project participants be established?

Good planning

In this film Sarah Wood, Manager of Grove Community Project, talks about project planning:

 

How a project is planned is as fundamental to its success as the content of the sessions.  Good planning involving all parties always saves time in the long run and will help to prevent problems arising during the project. Good planning will:

  • ensure that everyone has ownership of the project
  • create shared aims and expectations for the project
  • establish a climate of openness and mutual learning between all parties
  • acknowledge and recognise the expertise of all parties
  • encourage all parties to commit and take responsibility for the direction of the project
  • help all parties to understand each other’s worlds both in terms of ethos, practicalities and community
  • always bear in mind of the legacy and sustainability of the project.
  • ensure evaluation is built into the planning from the start

In this next film Cynthia Knight, Head of St. Thomas Children's Centre, talks about her role in planning projects:

 

Building relationships

This approach advocates that to work effectively means building relationships that support partnership and collaboration, and that the specific skills and training of both practitioner and musician should be valued. Any project planned should be seen as a learning process rooted in a network of reciprocal relationships between the musician, the practitioner, the setting, the parents and the child. Building these relationships allows all parties to better understand each other’s worlds and help them to work collaboratively in partnership for the best interests of the child.

Planning for sustainability

In planning the project it is essential to consider how quality music making can be sustained in the setting beyond the life of a project. This has a profound effect on the role or roles the musician takes and the role and training of the early years practitioner. Changing culture and embedding new or different working practices is a long process, perhaps taking years, and will only begin to happen if:

  • the project has clearly defined aims and clarity of purpose.
  • building relationships and developing a common language is a first priority.
  • The project is seen as a mutual two-way opportunity to learn that values the expertise and experience of both parties.
  • there are shared and negotiated expectations of roles.
  • the musician/animateur/workshop leader is flexible in their role and is sensitive about how their expertise is shared to empower early years practitioners.
  • the head or manager of the early years setting is involved, supportive and committed.
  • there is an understanding and commitment that the key practitioner will share their learning with other members of the staff team.
  • the early years practitioners feel confident to continue after the initial training programme.
  • there is identified time for quality reflection and planning between the key practitioner and the musician that is highly valued within the setting.
  • the framework complementing the ways in which learning and development are planned for in the setting and reflects their ethos and values.
  • risk-taking is seen as positive and an imperative for creativity.
  • environment, materials and resources are thought about carefully.
  • the trainer continues to mentor the musicians and early years practitioners throughout the duration of the project and helps to solve any problems that arise.

Planning questions

Questions

  • How can we ensure CPD and reflection days meet the needs of all participants?
  • How can we nurture reflective practice based on observing and extending children’s musical play?
  • Within the time constraints of three training and reflection days, what is the most effective use of that time?
  • What are the key ingredients for collaborative learning?
  • What do we need to do to ensure the sharing of skills, knowledge and perspectives?
  • How can we work towards the project being a shared endeavour with ownership held by all?
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