Funding

Wesleyan has just launched the Welseyan Foundation, a fund designed to provide financial support for local community groups and charities, to make a positive difference across four key themes: health, education, social development and innovation.

As external evaluators of Fund C, we are delighted to share some initial research findings and observations about what needs to be put in place for partnership-working to be effective and about its role in embedding inclusive music-making strategically and at scale.  

In light of Youth Music's refreshed definition for Coldspots projects, I delved into the evaluation data we've received from Coldspots projects since 2014. I wanted to see what they could tell us about improvements in the confidence of participants of our funded projects, and noticed that there were many more instances reported of girls and young women showing improvements in confidence than boys and young men. I picked out some key points that emerged from my research to explore this further.

Graucob Music Awards support young musicians of school age with a bursary of up to £750 to support their musical endeavours including specialist lessons, festivals, training events, instrumental purchase. 

Music for Alice has opened a new round of funding for youth organisations and groups using music for health and rehabilitation purposes. 

 

A project that looks to bring together Downs Syndrome support groups through musical collaboration; training and mentoring for young female musicians; music technology with children and young people in challenging circumstances; and music and play in palliative care, all make up Sound Connections Innovate programme 2017.

Today we are pleased to publish the application guidelines for the second round of Youth Music’s Fund C grant awards. Successful organisations will play a key strategic role in helping Youth Music achieve a musically inclusive England.

National Charity, "Music For All" kindly donated some music instruments and amps for young people who attend the Beats, Bars and Banter project in  Rugby, Warwickshire. The music equipment will be used within the weekly workshops that take place every Thursday 4-6pm at Hill Street Youth Centre, Hill Street, Rugby. Young people will also be able to take home the acoustic guitars so they can continue to practice away from the workshops :) For more info on "Music for All" visit: http://www.musicforall.org.uk/

Also, here's a video of the first two weeks of the Rugby music sessions :) More will follow shortly... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_hvBUYEJ8LA

 

  • by WKMT

    Sun 26 Feb 2017

London Piano / Music festival by WKMT

'Ready for music' - music therapy for vulnerable children was a Youth Music funded project which ran at Broadwaters Children Centre, The Ladder Children Centre (before closure) and South Haringey nursery. The project ran from January 2016 - January 2017 and was led by music therapist, Claire Hope (www.hopemusictherapy.co.uk). The majority of similar early years music therapy work occurring in the UK is funded by both the children's centres and The Primary Care Trust. In Haringey, however, there is limited NHS funding towards therapeutic intervention in early years and a high level of deprivation.
Weekly group and individual music therapy sessions were offered to vulnerable families, children with complex emotional, social and developmental needs and parents and infants on the 2 -year programme (a government childcare initiative offered to parents on low-income). It was agreed that the project would be flexible, allowing Claire to respond to the needs of the service users. Workshops, presentations and meetings with parents were also an important aspect of the project. 
Group sessions involved familiar songs/nursery rhymes, turn-taking, leading, conducting, musical arrangements (playing an instrument in a particular place in the music), improvising/free play, movement with music, imaginary play, stories with sounds, songs and puppets. These were closely monitored by recordings, written summaries, supervision and questionnaires. Staff commented ,and the music therapist observed, children's increase in confidence, listening, awareness of the musical interaction and an increase in using more words in songs and play, particularly for children with English as a second language.
One little boy, who was selective mute, tentatively began to use his voice to express himself in individual music therapy sessions. Through creative musical play (and the use of kazoos!), his confidence in using his voice to communicate developed and he began to talk in nursery. Due to the flexibility of the project, he was then able to join a music therapy group with his peers, further consolidating on his confidence and achievements.
Music therapy is vital in these contexts, where young children are seeking and needing early play experiences. There continues to be growing need and demand for music therapy and Broadwaters Children Centre is thrilled to receive successful funding for a further 2-year music project beginning imminently, entitled: HOPE music therapy. Music therapy for vulnerable children.'
 

Photo Credit: Stratford Circus Arts Centre / Rob Harris, Generate 2016

Do you work with a creative young person whose music project idea is ready to come to life? Are they aged 16-25 and signed up to Wired4Music, the music network for young Londoners? They can now apply for grants between £500 – £2,000 and support to get their project off the ground!

If you are not taking impact capture seriously for the projects you are running then I believe you to be looking down the barrel of a funding gun. It amazes me how many organisations don't collect the simplest of data like attendance or any form of 'story' from their participants. Money is scarce and getting scarcer. Commissioner's and grant givers require evidence that what we do is effective.