Policy

A project that looks to bring together Downs Syndrome support groups through musical collaboration; training and mentoring for young female musicians; music technology with children and young people in challenging circumstances; and music and play in palliative care, all make up Sound Connections Innovate programme 2017.

Through Upfaders i've been engaging hard to reach young MCs expressing their struggles by spraying bars - beats and bars is a proven combination, self-expression is undoudtedly healthy, The Youtube platform has empowered Grime culture, but is it all postiive?

We’re delighted to be welcoming community musician, lecturer and composer Graham Dowdall to lead our ‘Exploring music in challenging circumstances’ workshop on Thursday 30 March 2017. We have spoken to Graham in the run up to the workshop about his musical interests, inspirations and memorable moments. He also sheds some light on what attendees can expect at his upcoming workshop, tickets for which can be purchased here.

Over the past year Sound Connections has delivered three events celebrating musical inclusion; one focused on early years, one on working with young people in challenging circumstances, and one co-produced by Wired4Music with Sound Connections championing youth voice and participation. All three areas of practice still fight for their place in music education practice and policy and it remains important to shine a light on the best work happening in these fields.

The are the highlights of the year...

There is no extra charge if you wish to have a joint lesson with a friend or family member. You pay purely for the teacher's time, not how many are in the class. Similarly if you are not sure which instrument you wish to learn then come along for a free trial with a teacher who has a wide experience of many different instruments. Try them all and find the right one for you!

  • by ally

    Thu 23 Mar 2017 - 1 comment

Music in Mind is Rhythmix’s ongoing innovative music making programme for young people with mental health problems. It uses music making to enhance life chances and offers help to young people aged 11 to 25 years with mental health needs.

An opinion written piece by Tyler Edwards, an artist, producer and member of Wired4Music.

Music education in rural areas in jeopardy….BUT decent broadband is the answer

• Virtual music tuition can fill the gap for remote schools but relies on superfast broadband


• New report supports findings of “The State of Rural Services 2016”, published earlier this year by Rural England


In a new report launched today, youth music development charity NYMAZ spells out how digital technology could revolutionise the way schools provide music tuition. But it warns that poor broadband in rural areas is limiting young people’s access to equal life opportunities.

We’re delighted to announce the launch of our latest annual review, which captures another jam-packed year for Sound Connections.

If you are not taking impact capture seriously for the projects you are running then I believe you to be looking down the barrel of a funding gun. It amazes me how many organisations don't collect the simplest of data like attendance or any form of 'story' from their participants. Money is scarce and getting scarcer. Commissioner's and grant givers require evidence that what we do is effective. 

I am fascinated by Play and music education and that is handy because my Youth Music funded work is dependent on Musical Play. I also struggle with accounting for what I do because facilitating musical play is not an "exact science".
Last year I attended Gloucestershire University’s Playwork study day “Creative Accounting: Playful Rhythms, relationships and response-abilities”. It was led by Lecturers Wendy Russell and Stuart Lester and post graduate Playwork students as part of a series of seminar days for Playworkers, Urban Planners and assorted University students. Dr. Susan Young, creator of the MA Ed(Early Years Music) at CREC in Birmingham, used to tell us to read outside of our discipline and Playwork, which places itself as complementary to a conventional educational offer whilst not exactly “outside” was, for me at least, conveniently “next door” both conceptually and geographically.
“The most important reason for going from one place to another is to see what’s in between, and they took great pleasure in doing just that.”
Norton Juster, The Phantom Tollbooth

Calling all men working in early years music education