Policy

Doctors and healthcare professionals need to listen to young people and open up to the health and wellbeing benefits that the arts can bring. 
"When I perform as Samantics, I release so much energy that it becomes very cathartic"

This piece is written by Sound Connections Programme Manager Julia Roderick

In February, Schools Minister Nick Gibb gave a welcome call to action about SEN/D music provision. He states that ‘It is important that all pupils have the opportunity to participate in the arts. That funding should support all pupils, whatever their background, whatever their family’s income, and whatever particular special needs or disabilities they may have. No child should be excluded from music because they have physical disabilities or other special needs.’ In this speech he also talks about the excellent work the One-Handed Musical Instrument Trust is doing to remove the barriers to music faced by physically disabled people.

Cymaz Music has been working with Cornwall Music Education Hub (CMEH) since before it's inception. We have worked hard to ensure that inclusion is at the core of the Hub and have been involved as delivery and strategic partners since the beginning. This has included research and consultation into barriers and cold spots in the county as well as designing targeted programmes of support to ensure that the most vulnerable children and young people in Cornwall have had access to music provision.

Music has always been political. From the feminism of riot grrrl to the anti-establishmentarianism of punk. The problems many of the people we support are political too. From access to healthcare to support for looked after children, politics is the driving force behind the institutions that our lives are embedded in.

 

Music has always been political. From the feminism of riot grrrl to the anti-establishmentarianism of punk. The problems many of the people we support are political too. From access to healthcare to support for looked after children, politics is the driving force behind the institutions that our lives are embedded in.

We have been using our six categories of Youth Participation to review the ways in which we are working collaboratively with young people whilst supporting other organisations to do the same.

Demonstrating impact is a hot topic. Terms such as outcomes framework, Theory of Change, Cost Benefit Analysis, causality and soft versus hard outcomes are increasingly commonplace and it can be overwhelming figuring out what this all means and how it applies to you. In music education evidencing impact is often a complicated business, and funders require different types of evaluation.

On Monday 27th March 2017 the Musical Director, Amba Tremain, ran a Music Leader workshop for staff and volunteers from The Urban Vocal Group. The workshop covered many important topics involved with running a music session with young people; the room was full with potential tutors, volunteers and current UVG staff members. 

I am at the end of third day of the Walking the Boundaries, Bridging the Gap Community Music conference here in Waterloo, Ontario. 140 people sharing research, case studies, playing and listening in the context of the only CM masters and undergrad courses in Canada. 

As external evaluators of Fund C, we are delighted to share some initial research findings and observations about what needs to be put in place for partnership-working to be effective and about its role in embedding inclusive music-making strategically and at scale.  

A call out to the Digital Participation debate, introducing issues specific to our Music Arts Pod schools programme with disengaged pupils.